Thursday, July 29, 2010

Nyonya Cincalok Omelette



Here's a dish which I would categorise as real, unpretentious, homecooked fare. It is simple. And cheap. And easy. AND so delicious. It's called Nyonya Cincalok Omelette and it's something you might want to consider whipping up as a light meal or as a side dish. That is, if you like stinky food in the first place. Me? I adore it!

Cincalok, belacan, hae ko, fish sauce ... you name it, I love it (although I draw the line at petai, sorry!).



When inSing featured this dish (contributed by Debbie Teoh, cookbook author and Nyonya food consultant for Tourism Malaysia), I was totally sold. After all, I am such an eggs person! :D Also, with the recent rainy weather, it looked like perfect comfort food to have with white porridge. Mmmm ...



Recipe
(from inSing)

Cincaluk or cincalok are made from fermented shrimps or “gerago” or “geragau”, as the locals call them. Found along the shores of Malacca, these shrimps are less commonly available today as more beaches are being reclaimed. One Nonya favourite using this shrimp paste is the cincaluk omelette, whose taste is fully enhanced with a squeeze of kalamansi lime.

Serves 4

Ingredients
- 5 to 6 tablespoons cooking oil
- 2 tablespoons Cincalok
- 3 grade A eggs
- 1 big onion, peeled and sliced
- 4 bird’s eye chilli, sliced (omit if you can't take the heat)
- 1 big red chilli sliced
- Pinch of ground white pepper
- Salt to taste (optional, I omitted because it was salty enough for me)

Garnishing:
- 2 kalamansi lime, squeezed over the omelette before serving (substitute with regular lime if you can't find kalamansi)

1. Heat oil in wok, sauté the chillies and big onions until fragrant.

2. Add the eggs and give it a stir before adding the Cincalok and cooking it over low to medium heat. Adjust seasonings to taste. Omit the salt if it’s already tasty enough.

3. Once the omelette starts to set, flip it over and brown the other side. I like my eggs to be slightly tender on the inside, so I don't cook for too long.

4. Remove from wok and serve omelette with steaming white rice. Squeeze the lime juice over the omelette and enjoy. I only used one half of the lime and I thought it was sufficient. My helper, on the other hand, preferred it without the lime. Well, different strokes for different folks.



If you notice, my omelette is in a very pale shade of yellow because instead of using 3 eggs like the recipe stated, I used only 2. I had 2 egg whites leftover from making Spaghetti Carbonara for my children the night before, so I conveniently used them up for this dish. See, it's a great way to clear out the odd yolk or white you have sitting in the fridge!

PS: I used this (and another yellow) enamel plate for my guest post for Rasa Malaysia. Some of you emailed me to ask where I got them from. In Singapore, they can be found at those shops which sell "household" items (those that sell mops, pails, pots & pans, etc). I found THREE such shops selling these plates near my home, which means, they must be quite easily available. This green one costs S$1.70 and the other smaller yellow one costs only S$1.30 ... and I love how they trigger childhood memories the moment I serve my food in them!

36 comments:

  1. I've never cooked with cincalok. Isn't it super salty?

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  2. Cincalok is shiok! You struck a cord in my baba husband! I seldom use it because it's quite salty.
    You can also add a little to cucumber/pineapple/ onion/chilli pickle! Slurp! Sorry, got carried away! ;P

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  3. Nice!! Would try it out...Thx for sharing~

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  4. I love stinky foods =D And I love eggs too! I always cook eggs when I don't know what to eat....haha. This sounds delicious!

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  5. Why do your food always look soooo gooood??? Whether its a dish or dessert, you never fail to make it look appetizing. You're amazing, Ju!!

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  6. Don't think I have ever had cincalok...the nyonya omelette looks very appetizing~!

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  7. I have never cooked with cincalok too.. never tasted too... what does it taste like with omelette?

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  8. This looks absolutely delicious Ju...
    Not sure about the stinky but I love fish sauce!
    I would love a plate of this I am sure!
    L~xo

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  9. I have never heard of cincalok, but the omelette dish looks amazing, but I'm not a fan of stinky dishes LOL!!

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  10. pigpigscorner / mycookinghut: Yes! Super salty, that's why you don't need any salt/sauce, and this egg dish goes suberbly well with white porridge! Just made it again yesterday. Sedap. But how come you both never ate it before? It's a Malaysian export leh???

    busygran: I like to cut onions and red chillies and squeeze some lime, and then use it as a dip for fried fish. Oh boy.

    My other friends: Stinky food is an acquired taste. OK, what am I saying? I don't think I will ever acquire a taste for say, offals. Ewww. You either like these things or you don't.

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  11. It must be egg day today!;p

    I thought cincalok is a Teochew-thing, never knew its Nyonya-source. I know about cincalok but I never really tasted it cos it seems very salty (stinky) to me :O ...but I can take offals like gizzards and liver leh....oh no!

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  12. we have the same recipe! :)) almost. too funny ...:D

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  13. You're talking about something that I like here. My mom used to make this kind of omelet, except no cincalok. Instead, she added terasi. I ate usually with sambal kecap (kecap manis, sliced shallot, sliced chilies and drizzle with lime over).

    Btw, This dish reminds me of Little Nyonya :)))

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  14. Oooh I LURVE this!! Like you, my side of family like to use it as a dip the way you do it: cincalok + small onions + cili padi + sugar + lime....wow...so shiok! but my in-laws says this is very "poisonous" so I've not bought any in yrs

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  15. always when visiting your blog I learn something more about the asian kitchen. i love it...

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  16. I have ever tried cincalok, quite new to me. Having browsed the page you linked, then know it's made by fermented small shrimps. I can imagine it's very tasty.

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  17. I like chncalok and of course I like this dish. Mine is a slight variation with added minced pork.

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  18. I'm so addicted to Insing after followin the links on your blog the other day. My MIL is going crazy! lol We do need to celebrate our Singaporean roots! ;)

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  19. Ju, I've been having porridge this whole week, and this,like you said, would be so perfect with white porridge. Have never cooked with Chincalok. Will try to get bottle of it soon.

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  20. Ju, I love all stinky food, including durian and cincalok, BUT NOT PETAI! So, we have one commonality here. LOL!

    Have never tried making omelet with cincalok before. Doesn't harm if I give it a try though ... Thank you for sharing. Hey, seems like you're addicted to inSing!

    P.S. How was your dental appointment? Lovely, eh?

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  21. I'm totally with you--I use fish sauce a lot and filipinos use a fermented shrimp that I'm sure is similar to cincaluk. Acquired taste, for sure, but I've had some adventurous non-Asian friends.

    It's nice to see the kalamansi. My little tree is finally bearing fruit after 4 years and I'm really enjoying them. Your photos are beautiful!

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  22. Il tuo blog è fantastico si imparano sempre cose nuove. questo piatto è certamente squisisto e molto invitante dalla foto. Complimenti. Un abbraccio, buon fine settimana Daniela.

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  23. Ju,
    I also dunno why... maybe mom never used it before in her cooking, so I have never tasted cincalok but only know about it.
    Hey, I really want to make this to go with Teo Chew porridge.. I could imagine how tasty like you said!!!

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  24. Love this Ju! (though my husband does not appreciate the smelly stuff so if i made this i'd have to enjoy it all by my lonesome!) And how funny that you and zurin both.. (yeah ok you've heard this enough already =). I feel like I bought a nice bottle of cincalok from malacca earlier this year but what in the world did I do with it....

    And yeah the enamel plates definitely recall fond memories of my childhood...

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  25. l love belacan but never try to eat cincaluk..I can get Msia and Indonesia cincaluk here..Must try this type of cooking one day!!thanks for sharing:)

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  26. cincalok, i love it! hehehe.
    with 'orh lua' is the best! :)

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  27. That looks so so good! They sell cincalok here but I don't think it is the usual brand from back home

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  28. This looks sooo delicious...I like fish sauce if it is hiding in the corner of a dish. Maybe I'll get brave and try this. Thanks for the nudge :-)

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  29. Give me the rest, belacan, fish paste, har koe, etc, except cincalok. Still cannot have the stomach for it. :)

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  30. What a creative use of Cincalok. I just bought a bottle, time to put it to good use with your recipe :D

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  31. I wish I can get cincalok here to try this. It looks simple and delicious. I think it would be really good with porridge.

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  32. Ah, I am SO intrigued now - I really want to try this! I wonder can I find all the ingredients?? What I want to know is: Just how stinky IS stinky?

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  33. Those enamel plates are coming back with a bang. In fact, I've asked my sister who's visiting soon to bring me a stack from Nigeria as here in the Netherlands they cost a lot. And stinky food is yum. Depending!

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  34. your blog and you photo are very very beautiful!!

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  35. try out and it was good... i must say real appetizing, makes me wanna eat more rice... yum, yum... thanks for sharing the recipe!

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  36. This dish is awesome to eat! Can't wait to try it in Melaka, Lah!

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